I ______ed — Simple past tense Korean conjugation

Hello again! It feels like it’s been a while since I wrote a grammar post. I was trying to think of something that would be not too hard or time-consuming (grad school devours my free time!) and that would be helpful to a large number of people. I looked through my list of Korean grammar posts and realized that I hadn’t even yet done a post on the simple past tense! Let’s jump right on in.

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Looks like… -(으)ㄴ가 보다 and -나 보다

This post is sort of a continuation from the previous post on 것 같다. There, we learned that 것 같다 can be used to say that something seems like something else. It can be used to speculate about or give an uncertain opinion on something in the past, present, or future. Today, we will look at a similar structure.

(으)ㄴ가보다 and -나 보다 both mean the same thing; the form is simply different depending on what it they are attached to. This grammar means “looks like” or “seems like” and is used when the speaker has observed something that leads them to make whatever conclusion they have drawn. This is different from 것 같다 in that 것 같다 does not necessarily require the speaker to have observed something to use as the basis of their statement. Let’s learn how to use them.

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What’s the difference?? 이미, 벌써, and 벌써부터

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When translating Korean to English, “이미,” “벌써,” and “벌써부터” are all commonly translated as “already.” How do we know when to use each one? What makes them different from each other? Let’s find out!

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What’s the difference?? 어느, 어떤, and 무슨

I got the idea to write this post because some friends in a Korean-learning community I’m involved in were asking about it. 어느, 어떤, and 무슨 all seem very similar—perhaps even interchangeable—when you just look at how they are translated to English (that being, I have seen all three of them translated as “which” before). However, they have some important differences in when and how they’re used. Let’s take a look!

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[漢字 배우자! 1 ] What is Hanja?

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Welcome to the first post of my new “漢字(한자) 배우자!” I love Hanja, but a lot of Korean-learning resources don’t really cover it unless it’s a resources specifically targeted toward people who want to learn Hanja. In this first post, I’ll start by briefly introducing what Hanja is and why it matters to Korean, and then I’ll introduce a few characters.

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High formality conjugation (하십시오체)

Here’s a post for the beginners! Korean verb conjugation is different than English verb conjugation, and the form you must use varies depending on who you’re talking to and the social formality of the situation, among other factors. While this form isn’t the one that learners can expect to use the most, it is (IMO) the simplest to conjugate. Let’s dive in~

NOTE: I will not cover or use any irregular verbs in this post! I’ll save those for another post since I don’t want to potentially confuse someone seeing this information for the first time. Also, I will focus on the present tense, again to keep things as simple as possible.

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“…would…but…” -(으)련마는

More advanced grammar! This form actually gave me a lot of problems, especially its usage with past tense, but with some quiet thinking time and some help from some friends, I figured it out. I hope that reading this helps you as much as actually thinking about and writing it helped me!

This one is a pretty old form and it is also fairly literary as well, so you might hear it spoken by older people but you’ll probably be okay if you can just recognize and understand it when it pops up even if it doesn’t really come to mind for personal usage.

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