Useful expressions- being blinded and playing innocent

There are a lot of expressions that native Korean speakers use in normal speech. Some of them you might see in textbooks, but some you may not. I realized that I have been learning a lot of good words and expressions from my boyfriend, so I’d like to share two of them with you today~

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Indicating intent— ~(으)러 and ~(으)려고

Sometimes we need to indicate our intent or reason for doing something. In those cases, there are two forms we can choose from, ~(으)러 and ~(으)려고. Let’s see how to decide which one to choose, and how to use them both!

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About Bees

Hello, everyone! Here’s a self introduction post here so you guys can get to know me a bit better 🙂

You can call me Bees! I’m originally from the US, but I attended university in Canada. After that, I almost immediately moved to South Korea for work. That’s all I’ll say about my personal life here; I know you came for other things! Mainly…

Why did I decide to learn Korean, Chinese, and Japanese?

KOREAN (5.5years):

My interest in Korean started back when I was in high school. Languages have interested me ever since I was young—I spent seven years in middle and high school studying French, and I was originally planning on (and accepted to university to) pursue a major in French translation. If I hear a language and it sounds nice to me, I just need to know more about it! A close friend of mine introduced me to some Korean music and just… the sounds of the language were so beautiful to me. The intonation and the sounds I heard that English didn’t have just… I needed to know more about it. I started researching a little online, and just like hearing the language grabbed my attention, the shapes and structure of Hangul intrigued me further still.

That isn’t to say I jumped straight into Korean! I had an interest, but French was still my main concern. I decided that I would take Korean classes once I got to university, and that’s exactly what I did. Because understanding the culture from which a language comes is crucial to successfully acquiring that language, I also signed up for an introductory Korean culture class. The material I learned in that class was just so interesting to me, and I was having a bit of a crisis with my intended major anyway, so I ended up changing around my plan, Korean became one of my minors, and I haven’t looked back. Since coming to Korea, I have mostly continued to study and practice on my own except for a few months of government-sponsored Korean language and culture courses, and I am still in love with the language and country, far more than I ever was with French (sorry, Francophones, though it is still a lovely language <3).

CHINESE (about 8 months):

My interest in learning Chinese stemmed in part from my Korean studies and in part from my best friend. A large percentage of Korean vocabulary is derived from Chinese characters, so I decided to study Hanja, Chinese characters in Korean. I found it helpful, stuck with it, and finally I had 500 unique characters written down in my notebook! I thought to myself that I might as well learn Chinese, and that idea took root inside my brain and grew a bit until I actually decided to do it. Also, a close friend told me of his intentions to go to China for a few months to study the language, and my desire to share the experience of learning a new language him combined with my original minor thought to learn it, and that sealed the deal 🙂 Honestly, when I first started learning Chinese, I didn’t like how it sounded much. I was very much there for the visual aspect of the characters, but it has grown on me immensely!

JAPANESE (1 month):

I’ll admit it up front: I had a weeaboo phase back when I was in middle school. I was crazy about anime and manga, and watching subbed anime and listening to music that my friends sent me got me interested in the language. I tried to do some self-study, but the grammatical terms used in all the books and websites I used were so confusing to me at the time (particles? What the hell’s a particle??). And again, French was my main concern, so I just sort of let it go until recently. Here in Korea, there are so many people who learn Japanese, and I wanted to get in on the action! I decided to give it another go, this time using books written in Korean as my main sources. Since I now have a good understand of how particles work thanks to Korean, learning is easier than back when I was younger. Also, because Japanese grammar is generally closer to Korean than English, I can use Korean sources to help my learning process!

Anyway, that’s all! Feel free to message me if there’s anything else you want to know~ Happy studying, everyone!