I will… Simple future tense

Hello, everyone! A new grammar post has been long overdue on this blog. Apologies for the irregularity of my schedule!

Anyway, today we’ll talk about how to express simple future tense meanings. There are two ways: using the simple present tense, and using the structure -(으)ㄹ 것이다. Let’s dive on in!

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Before and after— -기 전(에) and -(으)ㄴ 후(에)

Hi, everyone! Last time, we looked at talking about “when” something happened using -(으)ㄹ 때. This time, let’s take a look at how to talk about the time before or after something happened. To do this, we’ll learn -기 전(에) and -(으)ㄴ 후(에) respectively.

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When… -(으)ㄹ 때

Hello, all! Thank you for your patience with my crazy posting schedule lately. I’m back with another grammar post, this time about -(으)ㄹ 때. This is a very common and very useful grammar construct, so if you learn to use it well you’ll be that much closer to becoming a fluent Korean speaker!

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I ______ed — Simple past tense Korean conjugation

Hello again! It feels like it’s been a while since I wrote a grammar post. I was trying to think of something that would be not too hard or time-consuming (grad school devours my free time!) and that would be helpful to a large number of people. I looked through my list of Korean grammar posts and realized that I hadn’t even yet done a post on the simple past tense! Let’s jump right on in.

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Looks like… -(으)ㄴ가 보다 and -나 보다

This post is sort of a continuation from the previous post on 것 같다. There, we learned that 것 같다 can be used to say that something seems like something else. It can be used to speculate about or give an uncertain opinion on something in the past, present, or future. Today, we will look at a similar structure.

(으)ㄴ가보다 and -나 보다 both mean the same thing; the form is simply different depending on what it they are attached to. This grammar means “looks like” or “seems like” and is used when the speaker has observed something that leads them to make whatever conclusion they have drawn. This is different from 것 같다 in that 것 같다 does not necessarily require the speaker to have observed something to use as the basis of their statement. Let’s learn how to use them.

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I’m ______ing — -고 있다, -아/어 있다, -는 중이다

In English, we use the progressive tense very commonly, and it’s just as useful in Korean. The progressive tense is used any time you want to indicate that an action or state is ongoing. For example:

I’m going to the store.

He is eating an apple.

Of course, it can be used in more than just the present tense. We also have past progressive:

I was doing my homework.

He was reading a book.

And we have future progressive as well:

I will be cooking dinner.

They will be taking a test.

So how do we make these kinds of sentences in Korean? There are a few simple ways.

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Noun modifier endings

Today I’ll give you an overview of noun modifier endings. I’m not sure if this is actually the proper term for it, but it’s what my teacher used back in the day!

Noun modifier endings are  actually applied to action verbs and descriptive verbs to change them into forms that can then be used to modify following nouns. More simply, they turn action or descriptive verbs into what we would in English call relative clauses and adjectives respectively.

A relative clause is a clause starting with a relative pronoun, such as “that, who, which, etc,” that describes a noun. You can think of it as a long adjective. Let’s check out some examples in English first:

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Even though… -기로서니

Have you ever had a friend or someone else start telling you about something that happened to them that they thought had a clear cause or was reasonable, and you’re totally on board at first… until more and more details come out and you realize you might need to set them straight! Or maybe you agree with something they said but not the conclusion that they drew from it. In these cases, -기로서니 might be the grammar you’re looking for to refute their claims.

(NOTE: This isn’t a particularly useful grammar point for speaking—the above examples were just to give you an idea of the meaning!)

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Grammar bite — 이르다 and 이르다?!

I was asked before which conjugation of 이르다 is correct, 이르러요 or 일러요. The person who asked had seen both of them and wondered whether one conjugation was preferable to another. The answer is that neither is preferable to the other because they’re different words!

이르다 has more than one meaning, and the two conjugations, 이르러요 and 일러요, come from two different meanings that are two different types of irregulars. Let’s take a look.

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Not only… but also… -(으)ㄹ뿐더러

Today we’ll look at some advanced grammar that is… pretty similar to something we’ve already covered! Let’s just straight on in and find out what -(으)ㄹ뿐더러 means and how it is used.

(NOTE: This grammar is largely a written form and you are unlikely to hear anyone actually use it in normal day-to-day speech, though it can crop up in more formal speech.)

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