Every time…! -(으)ㄹ라치면

Welcome back, everyone! It’s been a while since I’ve written on advanced grammar, hasn’t it? Today, I’d like to share a grammar form that can help you complain more (at least maybe if you want to speak like a book)! Sometimes the world just seems to conspire against you. Every time you want to go to the amusement park, it rains! Every time you want to visit that nice-looking cafe that everyone has been telling you about, it’s closed! In those cases, we can complain about our misfortune with -(으)ㄹ라치면.

Function

As mentioned above, this form is for complaining. More specifically, you can use it when every time you intend to do something, something else happens that makes it hard or impossible to do that thing.

Usage

This grammar is super-easy to use! Just slap -ㄹ라치면 onto an action verb root ending with a vowel or ㄹ. -을라치면 is for action verb root that ends with a consonant.

그 유명한 카페에 갈라치면 매번 휴업이에요! (Every time I mean to go to that famous cafe, they’re closed!)

모처럼 친구하고 만날라치면 친구가 아프다 해서 못 만나요. (Every time I mean to meet up with my friend, she gets is sick and can’t meet.)

이 소설을 읽을라치면 주변이 너무 시끄러워서 집중이 하나도 안 돼요. (Every time I mean to read this novel, it’s so noisy that I can’t concentrate at all.)

In simpler terms

-(으)ㄹ라치면 is not common in spoken Korean. It is more of a written form. If you want to make a spoken complaint to similar effect, you can use ‘-(으)려고 할 때마다’ or ‘-(으)려고 하면’.

그 유명한 카페에 갈려고 할 때마다 휴업이에요!

모처럼 친구하고 만나려고 하면 친구가 아프다 해서 못 만나요.

 

Happy studying~

 

 

What’s the Difference?? 또 vs. 다시

I feel like it’s been a while since I did a “What’s the difference??” post! Today we’re going to look at two different adverbs, 또 and 다시, that can seem really similar at first glance. In fact, they are interchangeable in some instances, but not always. How are they similar and how are they different?

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Direct quotations

Sometimes when we’re talking to someone, we need or want to reference what someone else said, or when we want to say that someone thought something. In English, we would just say “X said…” or “X thought…” or something along those lines. How would we quote someone or a thought in Korean? Let’s find out! Continue reading “Direct quotations”

What’s the difference?? ~처럼 and 같다

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I wrote this post to answer a question that an anon asked! ~처럼 and 같다 do have similar meanings in translation but they function quite differently. How are they similar, and how are they different? Let’s take a look. Continue reading “What’s the difference?? ~처럼 and 같다”

What’s the difference? — -고 있다 and -아/어 있다

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This post was inspired by a question that someone asked on the /r/korean subreddit (I lurk around there sometimes; if you Reddit, please do check out that sub!). The question was why some verbs use -고 있다 and some use -아/어 있다. If you check the question link, you can see my short answer on the original question. Also, I’ve actually gone over these two in the past, in a post about the progressive tense. The purpose of this post is to sort of clarify the difference between the two with a bit more explanation and contrasting examples.

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I will… Simple future tense

Hello, everyone! A new grammar post has been long overdue on this blog. Apologies for the irregularity of my schedule!

Anyway, today we’ll talk about how to express simple future tense meanings. There are two ways: using the simple present tense, and using the structure -(으)ㄹ 것이다. Let’s dive on in!

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Before and after— -기 전(에) and -(으)ㄴ 후(에)

Hi, everyone! Last time, we looked at talking about “when” something happened using -(으)ㄹ 때. This time, let’s take a look at how to talk about the time before or after something happened. To do this, we’ll learn -기 전(에) and -(으)ㄴ 후(에) respectively.

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When… -(으)ㄹ 때

Hello, all! Thank you for your patience with my crazy posting schedule lately. I’m back with another grammar post, this time about -(으)ㄹ 때. This is a very common and very useful grammar construct, so if you learn to use it well you’ll be that much closer to becoming a fluent Korean speaker!

Continue reading “When… -(으)ㄹ 때”

I ______ed — Simple past tense Korean conjugation

Hello again! It feels like it’s been a while since I wrote a grammar post. I was trying to think of something that would be not too hard or time-consuming (grad school devours my free time!) and that would be helpful to a large number of people. I looked through my list of Korean grammar posts and realized that I hadn’t even yet done a post on the simple past tense! Let’s jump right on in.

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Looks like… -(으)ㄴ가 보다 and -나 보다

This post is sort of a continuation from the previous post on 것 같다. There, we learned that 것 같다 can be used to say that something seems like something else. It can be used to speculate about or give an uncertain opinion on something in the past, present, or future. Today, we will look at a similar structure.

(으)ㄴ가보다 and -나 보다 both mean the same thing; the form is simply different depending on what it they are attached to. This grammar means “looks like” or “seems like” and is used when the speaker has observed something that leads them to make whatever conclusion they have drawn. This is different from 것 같다 in that 것 같다 does not necessarily require the speaker to have observed something to use as the basis of their statement. Let’s learn how to use them.

Continue reading “Looks like… -(으)ㄴ가 보다 and -나 보다”