What’s the difference?? ~처럼 and 같다

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I wrote this post to answer a question that an anon asked! ~처럼 and 같다 do have similar meanings in translation but they function quite differently. How are they similar, and how are they different? Let’s take a look. Continue reading “What’s the difference?? ~처럼 and 같다”

Grammar bite — Can two particles be attached to the same word?

I was asked once if multiple particles can be attached to the same word. The answer to that question? Absolutely! Some particles can double up, but some can’t (or at least don’t very commonly). Especially the plural particle -들 and the “only” particle -만 combine pretty productively with other particles. Here are some examples of particles stacking up:

학생들이 숙제를 냈어요. (The students turned in their homework.)

남자 친구는 저에게만 꽃을 줬어요. (My boyfriend give flowers only to me.)

만으로 거기에 갈 수 있어요. (You can go there by boat only.)

수강신청은 내일 아침 10시까지만 가능해요. (Course registration is possible only until 10am tomorrow.)

You’ll find more combinations as you encounter more authentic material. They’re out there!

What’s the difference? — -고 있다 and -아/어 있다

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This post was inspired by a question that someone asked on the /r/korean subreddit (I lurk around there sometimes; if you Reddit, please do check out that sub!). The question was why some verbs use -고 있다 and some use -아/어 있다. If you check the question link, you can see my short answer on the original question. Also, I’ve actually gone over these two in the past, in a post about the progressive tense. The purpose of this post is to sort of clarify the difference between the two with a bit more explanation and contrasting examples.

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I will… Simple future tense

Hello, everyone! A new grammar post has been long overdue on this blog. Apologies for the irregularity of my schedule!

Anyway, today we’ll talk about how to express simple future tense meanings. There are two ways: using the simple present tense, and using the structure -(으)ㄹ 것이다. Let’s dive on in!

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Before and after— -기 전(에) and -(으)ㄴ 후(에)

Hi, everyone! Last time, we looked at talking about “when” something happened using -(으)ㄹ 때. This time, let’s take a look at how to talk about the time before or after something happened. To do this, we’ll learn -기 전(에) and -(으)ㄴ 후(에) respectively.

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When… -(으)ㄹ 때

Hello, all! Thank you for your patience with my crazy posting schedule lately. I’m back with another grammar post, this time about -(으)ㄹ 때. This is a very common and very useful grammar construct, so if you learn to use it well you’ll be that much closer to becoming a fluent Korean speaker!

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I ______ed — Simple past tense Korean conjugation

Hello again! It feels like it’s been a while since I wrote a grammar post. I was trying to think of something that would be not too hard or time-consuming (grad school devours my free time!) and that would be helpful to a large number of people. I looked through my list of Korean grammar posts and realized that I hadn’t even yet done a post on the simple past tense! Let’s jump right on in.

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The many faces of -(으)로

-(으)로 is a very useful particle that can be attached to nouns (both normal nouns and nouns created using noun modifier endings) for a variety of usages. Especially at the beginning, it can be a bit hard or confusing to differentiate these different meanings. Let’s take a look at some of the most common usages of -(으)로!

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I’m ______ing — -고 있다, -아/어 있다, -는 중이다

In English, we use the progressive tense very commonly, and it’s just as useful in Korean. The progressive tense is used any time you want to indicate that an action or state is ongoing. For example:

I’m going to the store.

He is eating an apple.

Of course, it can be used in more than just the present tense. We also have past progressive:

I was doing my homework.

He was reading a book.

And we have future progressive as well:

I will be cooking dinner.

They will be taking a test.

So how do we make these kinds of sentences in Korean? There are a few simple ways.

Continue reading “I’m ______ing — -고 있다, -아/어 있다, -는 중이다”